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Tape/Off – ‘Vigorous Lover’ tour

Black Bear Lodge – 1 March 2019

Tape/Off – photo Bec Harbour

I saw Tape/Off at the Valley Drive In during BIGSOUND 2018, all I could hear was a wall of sound coming from behind the Brightside, and I wanted to know more. I checked them out on their Triple J Unearthed and Facebook profiles later on and realised that their favourite bands included many of mine. I like a noisy band.

Tape/Off – photo Bec Harbour

Tape/Off released ‘Broadcast Park’ last year just before BIGSOUND and the latest single ‘Vigorous Lover’ is a step away from their usual sound dynamic. Cnt Evn, Minor Premiers and Requin as supports were thematic choices with their own brands of quality noise.

Tape/Off played a solid set that included ‘Wake in Fright’, ‘Micronation’ and ‘Day In, Day Out’ and of course ‘Vigorous Lover’. ‘Vigorous Lover’ shows the melodic chops the band has and some clever lyric play: “She wanted a vigorous lover, that would go all night, I’m not such a vigorous lover, but I go alright…”

Get and see Tape/Off, especially if you like noise in abundance. The tour namesake single ‘Vigorous Lover’ shows a bit of a sardonic side through the lyrics and softer sound that you might not realise Tape/Off possess.

Gallery

Orbital

The Triffid – 27 February 2019

Orbital at the Triffid – photo Bec Harbour

Orbital came along for me when guitar based music was at a slow ebb and I was having a hard time finding anything that sounded new and exciting – I found their mix of electronic and samples of music I loved (Butthole Surfers Sweat Loaf anyone?). Friends who had experienced their live shows let me know that I was in for an amazing experience covering this show. I thought I would never get to see them live with them splitting in 2004 and again in 2017.

Rebel Yell began the night with a solid DJ set that warmed the crowd up for the main event. Paul and Phil Hartnoll came out to a crowd that was ready to dance filling their set with well known songs such as Chime and Halcyon.

The light show was impressive (I was slightly miffed that the best imagery was on AFTER my 3 song curfew). There was a lot of abstract commentary on events around the world in the imagery that may have been lost on the crowd.

I highly recommend seeing Orbital before Paul and Phil Hartnoll decide to retire the concept again. Their unique blend of electronica, punk and ambience has never been replicated, they recreate their music live in such a way that it keeps you guessing but leave no doubt what song they are playing.

Mountain Goat Valley Crawl

Saturday 16 February 2019.

What do you get when you band 10 live music venues together to put some seriously great bands on? The Mountain Goat Valley Crawl is what! Spread across 3 blocks (so easy scramble distance between venues) and some of the best up and coming as well as established bands from Brisbane and beyond, this always promised to be a good night.

As I got my wristband, I realised that I had left my glasses at home (hurrah for living very close – boo for disorganisation and bad eyesight!) so had to scoot home again leaving me with minimal time to catch Perve Endings at The Foundry.

Perve Endings do great synth punk pop – a lot more punk than their Unearthed Profile would suggest, and a lot noisier than their recordings there too. They had a decent sized crowd for a 6.30 slot – the hard work they have been putting in (Voiid’s Sludge Session to name one) has paid off.

Perve Endings – Photo Bec Harbour

The Bonnie Doons were on at the Crowbar in my 7pm timeslot. I have almost seen them countless times, only to have a scheduling conflict – interestingly enough there was one with this line up for me too – Being Jane Lane at Blutes. If you like a laid back, almost reggae tinged sound (think surf-punk-coastal music) you will love these guys. I thoroughly enjoyed the first half of their set – get on their Unearthed page and have a listen.

The Bonnie Doons – Photo Bec Harbour

Being Jane Lane were in full swing when I arrived at Blutes. By full swing, I mean going off. Blutes stage area is small and the band had spilled off the stage onto the floor area, merging with the audience. I saw them last supporting Horace Bones (I’ve said it once, I’ll say it again, a criminally under attended gig – RIP live music at the Bloodhound Bar) and missed them at VB Hardyards. I was trying to work out out where their lead singer Teigan was, she was in the crowd much to everyones delight.

Being Jane Lane – Photo Bec Harbour

After a quick dinner break, I went back to the The Foundry, where Tiny Castle was playing in the Back Room (AKA The Bowie Room). If you like bands like the Killers and City Calm Down, these guys are for you. It seemed that the audience was filled with friends and family (grandparents included). The Back Room at the Foundry has surprisingly good acoustics – it felt like we were at a house party in someone’s lounge room.

Tiny Castle – Photo Bec Harbour

My must see for the night was Cry Club. Their recordings only give half the indication of the energy and noise that comes from a live show. Heather is the consummate front person – high energy and engages with every member of the audience. I love noise pop that I can dance to and Cry Club are a band delivers this in spades.

Cry Club – Photo Bec Harbour

My first band at the Zoo for the night was Minor Premiers. This band sounds like they are from another time, like something off the early 90’s Merge Records roster. They had a bunch of loyal fans ready to go. I had been waiting to see them for some time and they did not disappoint. It was then off to Barbara to see Pool Shop.

Minor Premiers – Photo Bec Harbour

I had popped into Barbara earlier to do a light reading – it seemed darker and more crowded when I went back. Barbara is not really geared for this type of live music (and frustrating sound issues as well as lack of lighting) and the punters were all squashed in, with more trying to get in. I took my shots and went outside to listen to the rest of their set. Pool Shop is one of my favourite Brisbane bands, fantastic shoegaze style, melodic power pop.

Pool Shop – Photo Bec Harbour

My biggest scheduling clash of the night was Raave Tapes and IV League. I went over to the Brightside to catch IV League first. IV League put out a solid beginning to their set (was hoping for Superstar – maybe I left before it?) then off to the Zoo for Raave Tapes.

IV League – Photo Bec Harbour

I have been singing the praises of Raave Tapes to whoever will listen – I saw them live for the first time as the “surprise” band at the end of the Against the Grain festival. It seems that the rest of Brisbane has arrived – the line to get in was down to the convenience shop (thank you media wristband). It was already packed upstairs too. It was already heaving – Raave Tapes are a band that will make you have a good time, and all your friends as well. They invited a big pile of their friends up for their song “Corridor”, members of Bugs, Sweater Curse and Stumps and other randoms. The crowd loved every minute of it.

RAAVE Tapes – Photo Bec Harbour

After that little bit of excitement, it was back to Blutes for the “surprise” gig of the night – Washington. New songs and old favourites were performed. It seemed that not everyone got the memo about Washington playing straight away – the line up at the door started well into the set.

Washington – Photo Bec Harbour

Once again, Mountain Goat Valley Crawl put on a stunning array of talent. Because you can’t be everywhere at once, I missed Selfish Sons, Sleep Club and Requin – bands I really wanted to see. Stumps I missed due to utter confusion with the schedule (sorry guys – next time?). I’m looking forward to seeing some of these bands around this year.

Voiid’s Sludge Sessions with Dicklord and Perve Endings

The Foundry – January 12, 2019

Voiid – Sludge Sessions – The Foundry – photo Bec Harbour

This gig was the exact opposite of yesterdays gig at the Foundry (see previous story for SILO#4). Whereas the bands from yesterday’s gig were melodic fuzz pop, the bands from the Sludge Sessions were loud and the distortion was turned right up.

Perve Endings opened the Sludge Sessions with their noisy synth-pop punk playing crowd favourites like Good Boy and Peaked in High School. Keep an eye out for this band, they are good at getting their crowds dancing and with the catchy hooks they are putting out there they are destined for bigger things.

Perve Endings – Sludge Sessions at The Foundry – photo Bec Harbour

Next up was Dicklord. To be honest I had only heard of them through following Melbourne bands like Horace Bones on Instagram. I had an inkling that they would be a good set. They did not disappoint, and the loyal bunch of fans that turned up with a dildo for them to use as a prop were stoked with the band interactions with it and a police hat. Dicklord unsurprisingly sing about dicks. They were energetic and fast and I was beginning to regret not bringing earplugs for this gig.

Voiid are getting a solid following, they had a good turnout for the matinee under 18 show earlier that afternoon (more bands should do this – these are your future fans!). I last saw Voiid at Big Sound (where my camera suffered an injury – hence the lightning strike cover photo of Voiid I used for my website – that’s what happens when the stabiliser in your lens is destroyed).

Voiid played through their favourites such as Silly Girl and Not For You as well as covering Nirvana. This band have amazing songwriting chops and certainly good taste in music (nice Dinosaur Jr shirt Katie). Hopefully, this is the start of a tradition and there will be more Sludge Sessions in the future.