SILO #4 – Major Leagues, Grace Turner and Sacred Blue

11 January 2019 – The Foundry

The guys from Grain are getting very good at selected great acts for a great night out – Against the Grain festival was an eclectic line up of established and up and coming bands and their SILO nights are using the same formula.

The 4th instalment of the SILO nights grouped the very welcome return of Major Leagues with Grace Turner and Sacred Blue.

Sacred Blue have just released new music to the world (Spring – check it out on their Bandcamp). Their music is beautiful ambient shoegaze style and this was a great start to the night.

Sacred Blue – Grain SILO #4 – Photo Bec Harbour

Grace Turner and her band are one of the hardest working acts around (or are at least stretching themselves thin) as they took off after their slot to play Grow Your Own festival. From Newcastle, the flow of bands from Newcastle playing in Brisbane is increasing and Brisbane is loving it. I also love that Grace plays a Flying V. Her brand of jangly indie pop was a great segue-way to from Sacred Blue to Major Leagues.

Grace Turner – Grain SILO #4 – Photo Bec Harbour

I have photographed Jaimee in her other project Pool Shop several times last year and was very much looking forward to seeing and photographing Major Leagues. Major Leagues are a happy power pop quartet (if you love stuff like Best Coast, Throwing Muses or Belly these guys are for you). The ease of style and not missing a beat (except when Vlada lost an earring!) made for a set that went all too quick (they are supporting Snail Mail so if you have tickets to that you are in for a treat).

All these artists have Bandcamp sites – check them out below:

Major Leagues – Grain SILO #4 – Photo Bec Harbour

majorleagues.bandcamp.com

graceturner.bandcamp.com

sacred-blue.bandcamp.com

Against the Grain Festival

Fortitude Valley – 3 November 2018

This year was Against the Grain’s 3rd year, a truly boutique festival in a landscape of festivals being incorporated and going big, and often going broke. The choices of venues (The Brightside, The Valley Drive-In and The Foundry) and proximity were excellent choices and while I’m sure there were things going on behind the scenes, the experience seemed very seamless from an attendee’s point of view.

Created by Chris Langenberg, the third instalment of this festival sees him joined by Brodie Popple to create a festival experience that could really only happen in Fortitude Valley with the proximity of venues. The line up was thematic, covering no wave to dream-pop/shoegaze, for lovers of a distorted or jangly guitar with melody, this year’s line up was stellar.

The day was one of the first stinkers of the Brisbane hot season (let’s face it we really don’t have a summer or a winter here) and the thought of traipsing up and down with 8 kilos of camera equipment the block from Warner Street to The Foundry in Wickham Street was a bit daunting. Thankfully it was shaded, and a cool breeze kicked in for the afternoon.

A video production company had set up in the courtyard and invited me to capture some stills of the 2 bands they were interviewing, Blonde Tongue and Eliza and the Delusionals.

I caught Blonde Tongue’s set, it was nice to listen to some dream pop in the airconditioning. Blonde Tongue posted on their Facebook that they had not played a gig in about 3 years, no one could tell, they sounded great, and The Brightside’s acoustics kept their sound clear and unmuddied.

fullsizeoutput_e6f
Blonde Tongue – Photo Bec Harbour

Next up at The Valley Drive-In was Concrete Surfers, guitar-driven and danceable – although no-one was dancing just yet, the heat was still present. Then it was off to The Foundry for Sleepclub, another dream pop entry for the festival, there was a sizeable crowd for them. It was also my first encounter with the helium balloons used as decoration (please don’t).

It was then back to The Valley Drive-In for Eliza and the Delusionals. They supplied a giant slice of fun fuzzy guitar pop. Then it was quickly inside The Brightside to catch the first few songs by Candy, then back over to catch Pool Shop, who I was very keen to see after catching their Big Sound performances. Pool Shop has lovely whimsical music sung by Jaimee Fryer of Major Leagues, that will make you smile and nod your head along.

After Pool Shop, I stopped in for a food break at Blute’s in the Brunswick Street Mall. Blute’s has one of the best bar snack menus I have come across (go the fried mozzarella sticks and the Dorito crumbed popcorn chicken, you will not be disappointed). Then it was back to The Valley Drive-In for Sweater Curse.

Sweater Curse is one of my favourite Brisbane bands, and the Against the Grain festival is only here because of their guitarist Chris Langenberg’s vision and hard work, along with this years co-conspirator Brodie Popple. I had caught Sweater Curse the previous weekend supporting Horror My Friend on tour (which explains why Chris was hard to get hold of – he is a super busy person with a tour AND organising a festival). Sweater Curse is an amalgam of no wave influences as well as shoegaze to form their own beautiful noise. The recently released “Mon’s Song” is an already established crowd favourite as well as “Can’t See You Anymore”.

First Beige is anything but beige, on entering The Brightside there were people jumping around everywhere to their dance-inflected sounds. This is a band that looks like they are playing hard but having a really good time, the crowd are on board with this and were dancing hard and having a great time. It was then off to The Foundry to catch Totally Mild.

fullsizeoutput_e9a
Totally Mild – Photo Bec Harbour

Totally Mild were having sound issues, but once they were sorted they launched into their sweet dream pop sounds. After Totally Mild, it was back to The Brightside for the tail end of Maddy Jane.

The crowd was packed in at The Valley Drive-In ready for City Calm Down. The last time I saw City Calm Down was at Splendour in the Grass in 2016, they played late afternoon and did a fantastic cover of David Bowie’s Let’s Dance (which was very apt for that time). The crowd sang along with favourites such as Pleasure & Consequence, lead singer Jack Bourkes ability to draw the crowd into the moment evident with the sea of outstretched arms across the D barrier.

Then the secret, not so secret, after party act, Raave Tapes at The Foundry. Thank you for booking these guys, they are my new favourite thing right now. Raave Tapes are from Newcastle, like several of the bands on the line up (there was even a joke made that Newcastle was a suburb of Brisbane). From K Bye to Suds, they played everything that made you want to dance, they are an amazing and entertaining live act. About halfway through their set, they pulled Chris Langenberg and Brodie Popple up to do a song with them. Raave Tapes were a great end to a great festival.

fullsizeoutput_eb1
Raave Tapes – Photo Bec Harbour

Gallery